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In order for the countries to perform sustainable development over times in all spheres of people's lives without imbalances adequate long-term strategic plans for the future are necessary to be elaborated. Development strategies will be of true benefit only in case if they are based on robust and reliable statistical tools, allowing to conduct comparative analysis of country's performance in all key fields of human being and over time. As of today, it is known lots of such tools most of which represent some kind of special indices measuring countries' performance in that or another field in comparison to the other countries. Since such indices are based on cross-country comparisons a lot of robust country-level statistical data is needed, which can only be obtained by large international organizations, such as the World Bank, United Nations, Economist Intelligence Unit, Freedom House, World Economic Forum, Transparency International and others. They have developed a range of indices such as Human Development Index, Democracy Index, Knowledge Economy Index, Corruption Perceptions Index, Press Freedom Index and so on. Those of them, which are in open access, are available on our site and you can easily explore them through the page below by way of data or visualizations ready for analysis.

See also: Agriculture | Commodities | Demographics | Economics | Education | Energy | Environment | Exchange Rates | Food Security | Foreign Trade | Healthcare | Land Use | Poverty | Research and Development | Telecommunication | Tourism | Transportation | Water | World Rankings

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Negative Interest Rates Around the World

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Crude Oil Price Forecast: Long Term 2017 to 2030 | Data and Charts

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Inequality of Global Wealth

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