Coming soon
Meet Yodatai, your Digital Data Assistant. Learn more and get your early invite now!
Ocurrió un error. Detalles Ocultar
Usted tiene páginas sin guardar. Restablecer Cancelar

Information that EU member states submit annually per Regulation (EC) No 443/2009 to the European Commission and onward to the European Environment Agency (EEA) on newly registered passenger cars provide a unique opportunity to analyze CO2 emissions. The data reveal thought-provoking trends from the perspective of purchasing patterns of lowest to highest emission cars and the corresponding potential contribution of each make and model to air pollution.

  • Premium-class sport cars are the ‘dirtiest’ based on CO2 emissions, with Bugatti vehicles—each emitting more than half a kilogram of CO2 per kilometer (km)—at the top. Yet, the potential contribution of these cars to the climate change is restrained by the limited number on the roads. Member countries reported a total of only five Bugatti new car registrations during 2015. Likewise, only one Pagani, the second dirtiest car in the class, was registered last year.
  • In contrast, cars with relatively low CO2 emissions are, as a rule, more popular and consequently pollute more air in total. For example, while Ford cars are among the ten ‘cleanest’ cars—emitting around 100 grams of CO2 per km—with more than 1 million new Ford cars registered in Europe last year, the contribution from this make to atmospheric pollution is far more significant than that of Ferrari, the most popular premium-class sport car.
  • Excluding electric cars, hybrid cars, such as the BMW I (23g of CO2 per km), Fisker (53g of CO2 per km) and Smart (93g of CO2 per km), have the lowest CO2 emissions among passenger vehicles. However, just as too few of the dirtiest premium-class sport cars are registered each year to dramatically contribute to air pollution, too few of the cleanest cars are purchased to combat climate change. At least, for now.

The EEA data also reveal interesting differences among the EU member countries. Germany recorded the highest average CO2 emissions per new passenger car registered in 2015. Residents of other North-East countries such as Poland, Latvia and Estonia showed similar car buying preferences. Residents of South-West Europe, stretching from Portugal to Malta to Greece and even Croatia, knowingly or not, tended toward cleaner cars.

Percepciones de datos relacionados

Launch of International Transport Forum (ITF) Outlook 2017

The ITF’s 2017 Summit on Governance of Transport will explore the trends shape transport governance and identify the most pressing challenges in the transport sector. Through the governance lens, it will focus on infrastructure, global connectivity, the right regulation for innovation, and urban access and mobility. Transport governance affects decisions regarding everything from local cycle paths to global trade routes. The governance framework both responds to and shapes decision-making and policies addressing inter alia environmental and climate considerations, working conditions, accessibility, and technical solutions, as well as...

World's Safest Vehicles of 2017

Even as the design of cars become increasingly safety focused and even automated, speed, texting, and driving while under the influence contribute to a rising number of deaths from motor vehicle crashes, particularly in the United States. Asian car manufacturers nearly swept the 2016 motor vehicle safety rankings by the US Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), securing nine of the top 10 spots. Only Daimler's (Germany) Mercedes-Benz GLE-Class joined Toyota, Hyundai, Subaru, and Honda in the top 10. The IIHS testing of new cars in the North American market covered three safety components:Crashworthiness, a measure of how well a...

Car Production

44th Tokyo Motor Show