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The Global Hunger Index (GHI) is designed to comprehensively measure and track hunger globally and by country and region. Calculated each year by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), the GHI highlights successes and failures in hunger reduction and provides insights into the drivers of hunger.

The GHI ranks countries on a 100-point scale. Zero is the best score (no hunger), and 100 is the worst, although neither of these extremes is reached in practice. To reflect the multidimensional nature of hunger, the GHI combines three equally weighted indicators in one index number:

  • Undernourishment: the proportion of undernourished as a percentage of the population (reflecting the share of the population with insufficient calorie intake);
  • Child underweight: the proportion of children younger than the age of five who are underweight (low weight for age reflecting wasting, stunted growth, or both), which is one indicator of child undernutrition;
  • Child mortality: the mortality rate of children younger than the age of five (partially reflecting the fatal synergy of inadequate dietary intake and unhealthy environments).

Over the past 10 years most countries have made significant achievements in the hunger reduction. However, some states have failed: in Swazilend, Timor-Leste, Moldova, Paraguay, Sudan, Iraq, Syria and Namibia the overall hunger index score has increased in 2014, compared to 2005 (see the heatmap at the bottom of the page).

Source: Global hunger index, 1990 - 2014

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