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National and sub-national time-series data on Ebola cases and deaths in Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Senegal and Mali is the most comprehensive dataset on Ebola situation available to public. The data compiled manually by The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in West & Central Africa from a number of published reports (WHO situation reports and the data from the national Ministries of Health) and updated on daily basis.

In this interactive dashboard, you can explore the data various ways. Select the indicator from the list on the top of the page to see the national and sub-national maps with the latest data available. Choose the region in the table at the bottom to explore the full daily time-series history since the start of epidemy in the March 2014

Source: Ebola : Sub-national time series data on Ebola cases and deaths, 2015

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