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African Development Bank Group

The African Development Bank Group (AfDB) is a multilateral development finance institution established to contribute to the economic development and social progress of African countries. The AfDB was founded in 1964 and comprises three entities: The African Development Bank, the African Development Fund and the Nigeria Trust Fund. The AfDB’s mission is to fight poverty and improve living conditions on the continent through promoting the investment of public and private capital in projects and programs that are likely to contribute to the economic and social development of the region.

Todos los conjuntos de datos:  A C E F M N P R S W
  • A
    • octubre 2015
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 13 octubre, 2015
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      AFDB Commodity Prices, 2015
    • abril 2014
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 13 julio, 2016
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    • septiembre 2015
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 08 octubre, 2015
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    • enero 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 28 enero, 2016
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      AFDB Socio Economic Database, 1960-2016
    • diciembre 2011
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
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      Africa Millennium Development Goals
    • agosto 2015
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 12 agosto, 2015
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      African Development Bank, Bank Operations 2012
    • diciembre 2011
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
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      African Development Bank, Food Security, December 2011
    • diciembre 2011
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
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      African Development Bank, Food Security, Prices, Monthly, December 2011
    • julio 2013
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
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      African Port Statistics, 2013
    • abril 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 16 mayo, 2016
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      African Regional Energy Statistics, 2014
    • marzo 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 29 marzo, 2016
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      The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction.The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
  • C
    • junio 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 20 julio, 2016
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      This Dataset describes the list of common indicators from census datasets of african countries.
  • E
    • enero 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 19 agosto, 2016
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      The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction. The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
  • F
  • M
  • N
    • marzo 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 24 octubre, 2016
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      3The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction.The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
  • P
    • marzo 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 28 marzo, 2016
      Seleccionar base de datos
      The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction.The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
  • R
    • marzo 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 29 marzo, 2016
      Seleccionar base de datos
      The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction.The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.
  • S
  • W
    • marzo 2016
      Fuente: African Development Bank Group
      Subido por: Knoema
      Acceso el: 25 agosto, 2016
      Seleccionar base de datos
      The Africa Infrastructure Country Diagnostic (AICD) was an unprecedented knowledge program on Africa’s infrastructure that grew out of the pledge by the G8 Summit of 2005 at Gleneagles to substantially increase ODA assistance to Africa, particularly to the infrastructure sector, and the subsequent formation of the Infrastructure Consortium for Africa (ICA). The AICD study was founded on the recognition that sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) suffers from a very weak infrastructural base, and that this is a key factor in the SSA region failing to realize its full potential for economic growth, international trade, and poverty reduction. The study broke new ground, with primary data collection efforts covering network service infrastructures (ICT, power, water & sanitation, road transport, rail transport, sea transport, and air transport) from 2001 to 2006 in 24 selected African countries. Between them, these countries account for 85 percent of the sub-Saharan Africa population, GDP, and infrastructure inflows. The countries included in the initial study were: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, South Africa, Senegal, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zambia. The study also represents an unprecedented effort to collect detailed economic and technical data on African infrastructure in relation to the fiscal costs of each of the sectors, future sector investment needs, and sector performance indicators. As a result, it has been possible for the first time to portray the magnitude of the continent’s infrastructure challenges and to provide detailed and substantiated estimates on spending needs, funding gaps, and the potential efficiency dividends to be derived from policy reforms.